RSS
Follow by Email
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn


Volume 2, Issue 3  December 2019, pp. 104-120          Download PDF

Regular Articles
What makes students speak Japanese in immersion programs?

Kumiko Katayama https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2888-56431, Kayoko Hashimoto https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5080-57022

1 Griffith University, Australia k.katayama@griffith.edu.au
2 University of Queensland, Australia k.hashimoto@uq.edu.au

DOI: https://doi.org/10.29140/ajal.v2n3.225


Abstract

Language immersion programs, which are a form of bilingual education, are shaped by multiple factors, including the specific characteristics of the region, the language, the community and the learners, as well as national and regional policies on language education. While the underdeveloped production skills of immersion students have been identified as the product of teacher-centred and controlled learning environments, it is not known what role background or heritage language students play in the Australian one-way immersion context, where their presence itself potentially enhances the speaking environment. This paper, based on a project on developing speaking strategies for a Japanese immersion program in Australia, argues that the speaking performance of students in immersion classes is also determined by other factors, such as peer interactions with background students, whose treatment in education systems in Australia remains ambiguous, reflecting the history of separation between foreign language education in schools and the maintenance of mother tongues in the community. By applying Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA), this paper analyses language policy and educational documents and discusses how the language performance of individual learners could be influenced not only by the curriculum but also by policy makers' improved understanding of individual learners with diverse linguistic backgrounds within schools.



Copyright

© Kumiko Katayama, Kayoko Hashimoto

CC BY-NC 4.0
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.


Suggested citation

Kumiko Katayama, Kayoko Hashimoto. (2019). What makes students speak Japanese in immersion programs?. Australian Journal of Applied Linguistics, 2(3), 104-120. https://doi.org/10.29140/ajal.v2n3.225


Related Articles:

Interpersonal meaning of code-switching: An analysis of three TV series
Huabin Wang
Australian Journal of Applied Linguistics Published: 1 April, 2018, Volume 1(1), pp. 3-19. Download PDF

Revisiting the digital divide(s): Technology-enhanced English language practices at a university in Pakistan
Shaista Rashid, Una Cunningham, Kevin Watson, Jocelyn Howard
Australian Journal of Applied Linguistics Published: 31 August, 2018, Volume 1(2), pp. 64-87. Download PDF

Examining learners' further investment in Japanese learning through study abroad experiences
Fatmawati Djafri
Australian Journal of Applied Linguistics Published: 1 April, 2018, Volume 1(1), pp. 33-48. Download PDF

A day in the life: Mapping international students' language learning environments in multilingual Sydney
Phil Benson, Philip Chappell, Lynda Yates
Australian Journal of Applied Linguistics Published: 1 April, 2018, Volume 1(1), pp. 20-32. Download PDF

Designing a course in intercultural education
Adrian Holliday
Intercultural Communication Education Published: 11 August, 2018, Volume 1(1), pp. 4-11. Download PDF

Interculturality in a different light: Modesty towards democracy in education?
Yongjian Li, Fred Dervin
Intercultural Communication Education Published: 11 April, 2018, Volume 1(1), pp. 12-26. Download PDF

Revisiting communicative competence in the teaching and assessment of language for specific purposes
Shona Whyte
Language Education & Assessment Published: 30 April, 2019, Volume 2(1), pp. 1-19. Download PDF

Language learning and activation in and beyond the classroom
Julie Choi, David Nunan
Australian Journal of Applied Linguistics Published: 31 August, 2018, Volume 1(2), pp. 49-63. Download PDF

Then and now: Themes in language assessment research
Lia Plakans
Language Education & Assessment Published: 25 July, 2018, Volume 1(1), pp. 3-8. Download PDF

Beginning again
Glenn Stockwell
Australian Journal of Applied Linguistics Published: 1 April, 2018, Volume 1(1), pp. 1-2. Download PDF