Volume 16, Issue 1  April 2020, pp. 29–49          Download PDF

Regular Articles
Students’ evaluation of a classroom bring-your-own-device (BYOD) policy

Simon Thomas1

1 Osaka Prefecture University, JAPAN simon@las.osakafu-u.ac.jp

DOI: https://doi.org/10.29140/jaltcall.v16n1.208


Abstract

A bring-your-own-device (BYOD) policy advocates student’s unrestricted classroom access to their own technology devices to assist in the completion of learning objectives. Literature illustrates that implementing byod can cause trepidation at the administrative and teaching levels due to the potential negative consequences and distractions that it can cause, despite the benefits that can be claimed. Investigations into the use of BYOD in university level second language education in Japan are limited. Similarly, it is also largely unknown whether students can make the tangible shift to using their own devices in the classroom to assist in completing tasks while remaining task focused. This study illustrates student’s evaluations of a BYOD policy in a two-semester Academic English report writing and presentation focused program. It reveals, through a detailed categorization and illustration of qualitative comments, that students made a meaningful and positive shift in opinions. At the conclusion of the program, students placed a high value on the ability to use their own devices to achieve positive task outcomes. This study can build reassurances amongst teachers that student’s use of their own devices in the classroom can be targeted, beneficial and motivating.



Copyright

© Simon Thomas

CC  4.0
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.


Suggested citation

Thomas, S. (2020). Students’ evaluation of a classroom bring-your-own-device (BYOD) policy. The JALT CALL Journal, 16(1), 29–49. https://doi.org/10.29140/jaltcall.v16n1.208


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